A preferred non directional trading strategy is the option credit spread. This strategy is one of the easier option spreads to comprehend for newer option traders. In addition it is simple to place and there is not much to do management wise while the trade is in play – which allows the vertical spread trader to be freed from their trading chair and not have to watch every up tick and down that the market makes all day.

The vertical spread is a fundamental element to numerous other option spread strategies including the iron condor, the butterfly spread, the double diagonal and others. It if fairly common for beginning option traders to gravitate to this strategy soon after discovering options and once they have gotten their feet wet with the purchase of straight calls and puts, then covered calls, and debit spreads.

These trades are popular due to their high probability of winning. When placed and traded properly, it is possible for vertical spreads to provide the trader with consistent income month after month – without the trader having to be right about market direction. Basically, those who trade this strategy just need to be correct about one thing which is where the stock or index being traded will not go.

Let’s create an imaginary trading scenario to illustrate. Imagine that a trader believes that a particular stock will be heading down in the short term. Because he is bearish on this stock, he sells a bearish credit spread called a bear call spread which benefits from bearish move.

The only way this credit spread trade can lose money is if the stock winds up doing 1 out of 4 possible scenarios – giving our trader a three out of four likelihood of winning. If the stock moves down as our trader predicts he wins. If the stock stays stagnant and goes nowhere, he wins. In fact, even if the stock moves against our trader and heads upward he wins just so long as the underlying doesn’t move so far as to breach the spread sold. The only our trader loses is if the underlying moves far enough upwards passing the option strike price that was sold – which if it does, our trader could still salvage the position through appropriate management and adjustment methods

To see more about the credit spread option strategy, click over to this training website for scores of free education videos, samples, and tutorials on how to fittingly enter, exit, oversee and adjust the credit spread strategy to create a ongoing monthly profits.

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