A preferred non directional trading strategy is the Weekly Options Credit Spread. This strategy is one of the easier option spreads to comprehend for newer option traders. In addition it is simple to place and there is not much to do management wise while the trade is in play – which allows the credit spread trader to be freed from their trading chair and not have to watch every up tick and down that the market makes all day.

The credit spread is a fundamental element to numerous other option spread strategies including the iron condor, the butterfly spread, the double diagonal and others. It if fairly common for beginning option traders to gravitate to this strategy soon after discovering options and once they have gotten their feet wet with the purchase of straight calls and puts, then covered calls, and debit spreads.

Option traders love to trade this strategy because the way these trades are constructed can allow the trader to be wrong and still make money. If the trader creates a particular credit spread position, he or she can win if the stock or index being traded winds up doing three out of four possible scenarios. If the stock goes down, the trader makes money. If the stock goes nowhere the trader makes money. If the stock goes up a little, the trader makes money. The only way the trader can lose money if the stock goes up far enough to threaten the credit spread that has been sold. And even then, there are management and adjustment techniques that can be utilized to hedge against losses.

Let’s create an imaginary trading scenario to illustrate. Imagine that a trader believes that a particular stock will be heading down in the short term. Because he is bearish on this stock, he sells a bearish credit spread called a bear call spread which benefits from bearish move.

This trade can win in 3 of 4 possible stock movement scenarios by using this option spread. If the stock drops like our trader thinks it will, the spread trade wins. If the stock doesn’t move up or down – just stays pretty much in the same area as it currently, the spread wins. Even if the stock moves upwards – defying what our trader believes will happen – this spread trade could still be profitable – as long as it doesn’t move above a certain level. So, in each of these scenarios, this trade would be profitable. The only way they would not be profitable is if the stock moves up past the level that has been sold – in which case the trader would then need to either remove the trade for a possible loss – or adjust the trade in an attempt to make it profitable once more – making this trade which is also known as the Iron Condor a favorite among option traders.

Ted ‘The Spread’ Nino is an option selling fanatic – particularly fervent with playing the credit spread and the weekly options . Click over to his Iron Condor Education Site to see more about his First-rate Undemanding Plan to trade the weeklys for consistent profits.

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Filed under: Currency Trading

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